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Primeur weekly 2019-03-11

Focus

Interview with EuroHPC JU interim executive director Gustav Kalbe ...

Quantum computing

9,1 million euro for trinational quantum research ...

IBM achieves highest quantum volume to date and establishes roadmap for reaching quantum advantage ...

Microsoft Quantum Team is announcing the Microsoft Quantum Network ...

Los Alamos National Laboratory upgrades to D-Wave 2000Q quantum computer ...

New hurdle cleared in race toward quantum computing ...

Focus on Europe

Hyperion Research invites submissions for HPC Innovation Excellence Awards ...

Optalysys launches world's first commercial optical processing system, the FT:X 2000 ...

SDSC's Research Data Services to host first U.S. GO FAIR Office ...

Intel to support the Irish Centre for High End Computing on new collaborative quantum computing project ...

New simulation methods to visualise quantum effects in superfluid fermions ...

Middleware

International team to organize 2019 survey of MPI usages ...

Energy Laboratory chooses Qumulo's file storage for its computational science centre ...

Hardware

Mellanox showcases live system demonstrations of LinkX 200G & 400G cables and transceivers at OFC 2019 ...

Alan D. George named Interim Director of the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center ...

ScaleMP and AMD announce strategic collaboration for scale-up EPYC servers ...

NVIDIA to acquire Mellanox for $6,9 billion ...

Air Force Research Laboratory introduces new sharable supercomputing capability for classified research ...

Applications

High CO2 levels can destabilize marine layer clouds ...

Using supercomputers to checkmate cancer ...

Revealing the role of neutron stars in gravitational wave discoveries ...

UC San Diego scientists computationally model chemical realities of water ...

TACC assists in massive data collection effort in lung development to help premature babies ...

New AI tool revolutionizes process for matching cancer patients with clinical trials ...

Raph Hix models the inner workings of supernovae on the world’s most powerful supercomputers ...

EPFL researchers simulate the process of adhesive wear ...

The Cloud

Oracle participates in National Science Foundation Cloud for scientific research project ...

High CO2 levels can destabilize marine layer clouds

25 Feb 2019 Pasadena - At high enough atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, Earth could reach a tipping point where marine stratus clouds become unstable and disappear, triggering a spike in global warming, according to a new modelling study.

This event - which could raise surface temperatures by about 8 Kelvin (14 degrees Fahrenheit) globally - may occur at CO2concentrations above 1,200 parts per million (ppm), according to the study, which was published inNature Geoscienceon February 25, 2019. For reference, the current concentration is around 410 ppm and rising. If the world continues burning fossil fuels at the current rate, Earth's CO2level could rise above 1,200 ppm in the next century.

"I think and hope that technological changes will slow carbon emissions so that we do not actually reach such high CO2concentrations. But our results show that there are dangerous climate change thresholds that we had been unaware of", stated Caltech's Tapio Schneider, Theodore Y. Wu Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering and senior research scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which Caltech manages for NASA. Tapio Schneider, the lead author of the study, notes that the 1,200-ppm threshold is a rough estimate rather than a firm number.

The study could help solve a longstanding mystery in paleoclimatology. Geological records indicate that during the Eocene - around 50 million years ago, the Arctic was frost free and home to crocodiles. However, according to existing climate models, CO2levels would need to rise above 4,000 ppm to heat the planet enough for the Arctic to be that warm. This is more than twice as high as the likely CO2concentration during this time period. However, a warming spike caused by the loss of stratus cloud decks could explain the appearance of the Eocene's hothouse climate.

Stratus cloud decks cover about 20 percent of subtropical oceans and are prevalent in the eastern portions of those oceans - for example, off the coasts of California or Peru. The clouds cool and shade the earth as they reflect the sunlight that hits them back into space. That makes them important for regulating Earth's surface temperature. The problem is that the turbulent air motions that sustain these clouds are too small to be resolvable in global climate models.

To circumvent the inability to resolve the clouds at a global scale, Tapio Schneider and his co-authors, Colleen Kaul and Kyle Pressel of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, created a small-scale model of a representative atmospheric section above a subtropical ocean, simulating the clouds and their turbulent motions over this ocean patch on supercomputers. They observed instability of the cloud decks followed by a spike in warming when CO2 levels exceeded 1,200 ppm. The researchers also found that once the cloud decks vanished, they did not reappear until CO2 levels dropped to levels substantially below where the instability first occurred.

"This research points to a blind spot in climate modelling", stated Tapio Schneider, who is currently leading a consortium called the Climate Modeling Alliance (CliMA) in an effort to build a new climate model. CliMA will use data assimilation and machine-learning tools to fuse Earth observations and high-resolution simulations into a model that represents clouds and other important small-scale features better than existing models. One use of the new model will be to determine more precisely the CO2 level at which the instability of the cloud decks occurs.

The new paper is titled " Possible climate transitions from breakup of stratocumulus decks under greenhouse warming ". Colleen Kaul and Kyle Pressel completed this work as research scientists in Tapio Schneider's lab. This research was supported by Caltech senior trustee Charles Trimble (BS '63, MS '64) and the GPS Chair's Council.
Source: California Institute of Technology - Caltech

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2019-03-11

Focus

Interview with EuroHPC JU interim executive director Gustav Kalbe ...

Quantum computing

9,1 million euro for trinational quantum research ...

IBM achieves highest quantum volume to date and establishes roadmap for reaching quantum advantage ...

Microsoft Quantum Team is announcing the Microsoft Quantum Network ...

Los Alamos National Laboratory upgrades to D-Wave 2000Q quantum computer ...

New hurdle cleared in race toward quantum computing ...

Focus on Europe

Hyperion Research invites submissions for HPC Innovation Excellence Awards ...

Optalysys launches world's first commercial optical processing system, the FT:X 2000 ...

SDSC's Research Data Services to host first U.S. GO FAIR Office ...

Intel to support the Irish Centre for High End Computing on new collaborative quantum computing project ...

New simulation methods to visualise quantum effects in superfluid fermions ...

Middleware

International team to organize 2019 survey of MPI usages ...

Energy Laboratory chooses Qumulo's file storage for its computational science centre ...

Hardware

Mellanox showcases live system demonstrations of LinkX 200G & 400G cables and transceivers at OFC 2019 ...

Alan D. George named Interim Director of the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center ...

ScaleMP and AMD announce strategic collaboration for scale-up EPYC servers ...

NVIDIA to acquire Mellanox for $6,9 billion ...

Air Force Research Laboratory introduces new sharable supercomputing capability for classified research ...

Applications

High CO2 levels can destabilize marine layer clouds ...

Using supercomputers to checkmate cancer ...

Revealing the role of neutron stars in gravitational wave discoveries ...

UC San Diego scientists computationally model chemical realities of water ...

TACC assists in massive data collection effort in lung development to help premature babies ...

New AI tool revolutionizes process for matching cancer patients with clinical trials ...

Raph Hix models the inner workings of supernovae on the world’s most powerful supercomputers ...

EPFL researchers simulate the process of adhesive wear ...

The Cloud

Oracle participates in National Science Foundation Cloud for scientific research project ...