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Primeur weekly 2019-05-20

Quantum computing

D-Wave makes new lower-noise quantum processor available in Leap ...

Atos delivers world's highest-performing quantum simulator to multinational energy company Total ...

Digital quantum simulators can be astonishingly robust ...

Generating high-quality single photons for quantum computing ...

Quantum world-first: researchers reveal accuracy of two-qubit calculations in silicon ...

Accelerating quantum technologies with materials processing at the atomic scale ...

Focus on Europe

GCS grants more than 1 billion computing core hours to national large-scale research projects ...

GCS announces new Chair of the Board, Prof. Dr. Dieter Kranzlmüller ...

Applications to 19th PRACE Project Access Call ...

PRACE Awards @ EuroHPC Summit Week 2019 ...

ISC High Performance announce David Keyes as 2020 Programme Chair ...

National eScience Symposium 2019 to cover Digital Challenges in Open Science ...

Middleware

RedLine becomes Bright Computing Services Partner ...

eSilicon chooses Univa to manage complex ASIC chip designs for high-bandwidth networking, high-performance computing, AI and 5G infrastructure applications ...

Hardware

Boston Limited to officially launch operations in South Africa during a series of High-Performance Computing (HPC) events hosted by the Centre for High-Performance Computing (CHPC) ...

HPE to acquire supercomputing vendor Cray ...

China to build new national supercomputing centre ...

Mellanox Capital invests in storage experts Excelero and WekaIO ...

Mellanox introduces advanced Network Telemetry technology to keep your business up and running ...

Supermicro announces third quarter fiscal 2019 preliminary financial information and files 2017 form 10-K and form 10-Q/As ...

Atos launches the world's highest performing Edge Computing server ...

NVIDIA announces financial results for first quarter fiscal 2020 ...

NERSC's Edison supercomputer to retire after five years of service ...

WekaIO raises $31,7 million in Series C funding ...

Energy free superfast computing invented by scientists using light pulses ...

Applications

Atos launches myQLM to democratize quantum programming for researchers, students and developers worldwide ...

A step towards probabilistic computing ...

CosmoGAN: Training a neural network to study dark matter ...

New AI sees like a human, filling in the blanks ...

Digital quantum simulators can be astonishingly robust

14 May 2019 Heidelberg - In solving quantum-physical problems in many-body systems, such as predicting material properties, conventional computers rapidly reach the limits of their capacity. Digital quantum simulators might help, but until now they are drastically limited to small systems with few particles and only short simulation times. Now, Heidelberg University physicist Dr. Philipp Hauke and colleagues from Dresden and Innsbruck, Austria, have demonstrated that such simulations can be more "robust" and hence much more stable than previously assumed. The results of their research were published inScience Advances.

In quantum physics, many-body theory describes a large number of interacting particles. In the state of thermodynamic equilibrium, the many-body system can be described by only a handful of values such as temperature or pressure, which are largely homogeneous for the entire system. But what happens over time after a major perturbation, such as when energy is abruptly deposited in a material sample by short laser pulses? Precisely calculating the so-called non-equilibrium dynamics of interacting many-body systems is a high-profile problem in quantum physics.

Calculations using conventional computers require resources that increase exponentially with the number of constituent quantum particles. "So computationally exact methods fail with just a few dozen particles. That is far less than the number needed to predict material properties, for example. In such cases, scientists rely on approximation methods that are often uncontrolled, particularly when it comes to dynamic properties", explained Dr. Hauke, a researcher at the Kirchhoff Institute for Physics and the Institute for Theoretical Physics of Heidelberg University. Digital quantum simulation provides one possible workaround. The non-equilibrium dynamics are studied with simulators that themselves are governed by quantum-mechanical laws.

Depicting the time evolution in a quantum computer requires discretising it into individual operations. But this approach - also known as Trotterization - unavoidably generates an error inherent in the simulation itself. This Trotter error can be mitigated by sufficiently fine discretisations. Extremely small discretisation steps must be chosen, however, to depict reliably a longer time evolution. Until now, research has maintained that the error quickly grows over long time periods and with a larger number of particles - which for all practical purposes drastically limits digital quantum simulation to small systems and short times.

Using numerical demonstrations and analytical arguments, the researchers have now shown that quantum simulation is much more "robust" and hence more stable than previously assumed, as long as only values that are relevant in practice - such as averages across the entire system - are considered and not the full state of each individual particle. For such values, there is a sharp threshold between a region with controllable errors and a simulation that can no longer deliver a usable result. Below this threshold, the Trotter error has only limited impact - in fact for all time periods that could be practically simulated and largely independent of the number of constituent particles.

At the same time, the research showed that digital quantum simulation can deliver astonishingly precise results using unexpectedly large Trotter steps. "A simulation that can predict the behaviour of many quantum particles over a longer time therefore becomes more and more likely. This further opens the door for practical applications, ranging from materials science and quantum chemistry to issues in fundamental physics", stated Dr. Hauke, who heads the "Quantum optics and quantum many-body theory" research group.

The research was conducted in collaboration with Dr. Markus Heyl of the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden and Prof. Dr. Peter Zoller of the University of Innsbruck. At Heidelberg University, it was carried out as part of the Collaborative Research Centre "Isolated Quantum Systems and Universality in Extreme Conditions" (SFB 1225).

M. Heyl, P. Hauke, and P. Zoller are the authors of the paper titled " Quantum localization bounds Trotter errors in digital quantum simulation ", published inScience Advances2019.

Source: Heidelberg Universität

Back to Table of contents

Primeur weekly 2019-05-20

Quantum computing

D-Wave makes new lower-noise quantum processor available in Leap ...

Atos delivers world's highest-performing quantum simulator to multinational energy company Total ...

Digital quantum simulators can be astonishingly robust ...

Generating high-quality single photons for quantum computing ...

Quantum world-first: researchers reveal accuracy of two-qubit calculations in silicon ...

Accelerating quantum technologies with materials processing at the atomic scale ...

Focus on Europe

GCS grants more than 1 billion computing core hours to national large-scale research projects ...

GCS announces new Chair of the Board, Prof. Dr. Dieter Kranzlmüller ...

Applications to 19th PRACE Project Access Call ...

PRACE Awards @ EuroHPC Summit Week 2019 ...

ISC High Performance announce David Keyes as 2020 Programme Chair ...

National eScience Symposium 2019 to cover Digital Challenges in Open Science ...

Middleware

RedLine becomes Bright Computing Services Partner ...

eSilicon chooses Univa to manage complex ASIC chip designs for high-bandwidth networking, high-performance computing, AI and 5G infrastructure applications ...

Hardware

Boston Limited to officially launch operations in South Africa during a series of High-Performance Computing (HPC) events hosted by the Centre for High-Performance Computing (CHPC) ...

HPE to acquire supercomputing vendor Cray ...

China to build new national supercomputing centre ...

Mellanox Capital invests in storage experts Excelero and WekaIO ...

Mellanox introduces advanced Network Telemetry technology to keep your business up and running ...

Supermicro announces third quarter fiscal 2019 preliminary financial information and files 2017 form 10-K and form 10-Q/As ...

Atos launches the world's highest performing Edge Computing server ...

NVIDIA announces financial results for first quarter fiscal 2020 ...

NERSC's Edison supercomputer to retire after five years of service ...

WekaIO raises $31,7 million in Series C funding ...

Energy free superfast computing invented by scientists using light pulses ...

Applications

Atos launches myQLM to democratize quantum programming for researchers, students and developers worldwide ...

A step towards probabilistic computing ...

CosmoGAN: Training a neural network to study dark matter ...

New AI sees like a human, filling in the blanks ...